Poori

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Poori (Puri) is an Indian fried puffed bread that is made using whole wheat flour. This unleavened bread is soft, fluffy, and crispy and is perfect to serve with Indian curries. Check out my easy recipe to make perfectly puffed-up poori every single time.

Here are some other Indian bread recipes that you might also like – Lachha Paratha, Bedmi Poori, Garlic Naan, or Masala Paratha.

About This Recipe

Poori is an unleavened Indian puffed bread made using whole wheat flour. It is one of the most popular bread in India and just like roti and paratha, it can be served any time of the day.

Since the puri dough is not leavened (fermented), you can make this bread quickly. A perfect poori is evenly puffed, soft, and pillowy from inside with a thin crispy layer on top, just right to scoop a rich creamy curry.

Poori can be served for breakfast, lunch, or dinner with savory dishes like pickles, curries, dry sabji, or sweets like shrikhand, halwa, kheer, or aamras.

This puffed bread is made for all the special occasions, weddings, and festive meals in India and is served along with rich curries. Chole Puri or Aloo ki Sabji Poori is a weekend special meal in many Indian households.

It is also a great option to pack for school lunches and picnics. A lot of Indians carry a box full of poori and pickles while traveling. It keeps well at room temperature for 2-3 days and comes in handy while traveling.

Making perfect puri might look a little daunting at first, but trust me it is not. By keeping a few tips and tricks in mind, even a novice chef can make perfectly puffed round puri without much effort.

Ingredients

Whole Wheat Flour – Poori is made using whole wheat flour, the same flour that is used to make chapati. Some people add a little all-purpose flour to the dough to make it crispier and whiter but I like to make it with only whole wheat flour.

Note – Try to get the flour from an Indian grocery store. The one you get at the regular stores is not the same and your poori might not turn out perfect.

Semolina – Fine semolina or sooji is added to give a crispy texture to the puri. They also hold their shape for a longer time if semolina is added to the dough.

Oil – I mostly use rice bran oil or vegetable oil to fry the puri. You can fry them in ghee as well.

Salt and Sugar – I add a little sugar to the dough as it caramelizes while frying giving the poori a lovely brown color. Salt is added to give them a little flavor.

How To Make Poori

Mix 2 cups whole wheat flour, 1 teaspoon sugar, ½ teaspoon salt, and 4 teaspoon fine semolina (sooji) in a large mixing bowl.

Add water (approx ¾ cup) little by little and knead to make a tight dough. The consistency of the dough is very important in making good puffed-up puri. It should be tighter than the regular roti dough. If the dough is not tight, the poori won’t puff up well and will absorb more oil.

Note – You can use a stand mixed fitted with a dough attachment to knead the dough.

Cover the dough with a clean kitchen cloth and keep it aside for 15 minutes.

Knead the dough again for a minute until it is smooth and then divide it into 14-16 equal size balls.

Take one ball and apply 2-3 drops of oil over it. Roll it into a 4-inch circle. The side of the circle should be slightly thinner than the center. Roll 3-4 balls and keep the rest covered with a kitchen cloth.

Note – Never use dry flour to roll the dough. It will burn in the oil while frying, become black, and stick to the next poori.

Note – Do not roll the puri too thin otherwise it will hard while frying.

Tip – If you have trouble rolling out round poori, then roll the dough into a rough circle. Use a cookie cutter or any sharp 4-inch round object and cut the dough using it.

Heat 4-5 cups of oil for frying the poori in a pan over high heat. We need very hot oil to fry the poories. If they are fried in less hot oil, they will not puff up perfectly and will also absorb more oil.

NoteTo check if the oil is hot enough, drop a small ball of dough into it. If it rises immediately, it means the oil is hot enough to fry the puri.

Slide a rolled puri from the side of the pan gently in the hot oil and fry until it puffs up (10-15 seconds). Keep pressing gently with the back of a slotted spoon. Flip and fry from the other side as well until nicely browned (10-15 seconds).

Drain it on a plate lined with a paper towel. Fry all the rolled poori in the same manner.

Note – Once the rolled puries are fried, reduce the heat to low and roll another batch. Set the heat to high again and heat the oil well. Now fry the next batch.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why is my poori oily?

One of the main reasons for poori soaking more oil is the consistency of the dough. Make sure your dough is tight and not soft. Puri also becomes soft if fried in less hot oil. So make sure the oil is heated well before you drop puri into it.

Is poori healthy?

No, since they are deep-fried, they are not the healthiest choice. I suggest making them only for special occasions and controlling your portions.

How is poori different from bhatura?

Both bhatura and poori are Indian fried puffed bread but they are very different from each other. While poori is made using whole wheat flour, bhatura is made using all-purpose flour. Puri dough is unleavened while bhatura dough is leavened or fermented. Poori is smaller in size while bhatura is larger. Do check out my bhatura recipe here.

Variations

This recipe I have shared with you today makes the classic puri, but you can do many variations with it. Some of them are

Beetroot Poori – Add some beetroot puree to the dough. This puree will give a nice pink color to it.

Palak Poori – Add palak or spinach puree and make a dough.

Luchi – Bengalis make poori using only maida or all-purpose flour and it is called Luchi.

Aloo Puri – In this version, boiled and mashed potatoes are added to the dough along with a few spices.

Namak Ajwain – Add some ajwain (carom seeds) and some salt to the dough and then make poori from it.

Methi Poori – Adding some freshly chopped methi (fenugreek) leaves to the dough gives a nice taste to it.

Masala – Add dry spice powders like dry mango powder, anardana powder (pomegranate powder), red chili powder, etc to make this delicious masala poori.

Serving Suggestions

Poori tastes best hot, right out from the oil and it can be served with any Indian curry or sabji like Batata Bhaji, Aloo Matar Curry, Dum Aloo, Kashmiri Dum Aloo, Bengali Aloo Dum, Bhandare Wale Aloo, Dahi Wale Aloo, Punjabi Chole, Amritsari Chole or Kala Chana Curry.  

Puri Aamras is a very popular combination and is very popular in Gujarat and Maharashtra. It also pairs well with sweets like Kheer, Shrikhand, and Sooji Halwa.

During Navratri, on the 8th day, many people do Kanjak and serve Puri, Suji Ka Halwa, and Sookha Chana as Prashad.

Storage Suggestions

Poori keeps good at room temperature for 2-3 days. Just let them cool and store in an airtight container or wrap them in aluminum foil.

You can also refrigerate them for 4-5 days in an airtight container.

You can also make the puri dough and refrigerate it for 2-3 days or freeze it for up to a month. Just let it come to room temperature before using.

You Might Also Like

  • Chana Masala
  • Saag Paneer
  • Aloo Matar
  • Paneer Masala

Recipe Card

Poori Recipe

Poori is a fried puffed Indian bread which is made using whole wheat flour. My recipe with tell you tips and tricks to make the perfect golden soft puri at home.

3.82 from 11 votes

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Course: Breakfast, Main Course
Cuisine: Indian
Diet: Vegan, Vegetarian
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 19kcal
Author: Neha Mathur

Ingredients 

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 4 teaspoons fine semolina (sooji)
  • oil for frying

Instructions

  • Mix whole wheat flour, sugar, salt, and fine semolina (sooji) in a large mixing bowl.
  • Add water (approx ¾ cup) little by little and knead to make a tight dough. The consistency of the dough is very important in making good puffed-up puri. It should be tighter than the regular roti dough. If the dough is not tight, the poori won’t puff up well and will absorb more oil.
  • Cover the dough with a clean kitchen cloth and keep it aside for 15 minutes.
  • Knead the dough again for a minute until it is smooth and then divide it into 14-16 equal size balls.
  • Take one ball and apply 2-3 drops of oil over it. Roll it into a 4-inch circle. The side of the circle should be slightly thinner than the center. Roll 3-4 balls and keep the rest covered with a kitchen cloth.
  • Heat 4-5 cups of oil for frying the poori in a pan over high heat. We need very hot oil to fry the poories. If the poories are fried in less hot oil, they will not puff up perfectly and will also absorb more oil.
  • Slide a rolled poori from the side of the pan gently in the hot oil and fry until it puffs up (10-15 seconds). Keep pressing gently with the back of a slotted spoon. Flip and fry from the other side as well until nicely browned (10-15 seconds).
  • Drain it on a plate lined with a paper towel. Fry all the rolled poori in the same manner.

Notes

You can use a stand mixed fitted with a dough attachment to knead the dough.

Never use dry flour to roll the dough. It will burn in the oil while frying, become black, and stick to the next poori.

Do not roll the puri too thin otherwise, it will hard while frying.

If you have trouble rolling out round poori, then roll the dough into a rough circle. Use a cookie cutter or any sharp 4-inch round object and cut the dough using it.

To check if the oil is hot enough, drop a small ball of dough into it. If it rises immediately, it means the oil is hot enough to fry the puri.

Once the rolled poories are fried, reduce the heat to low and roll another batch. Set the heat to high again and heat the oil well. Now fry the next batch.

Nutrition

Calories: 19kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 291mg | Potassium: 9mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Iron: 1mg
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